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. >> cut us off a little bit. >> david, let's talk about energy efficiency. i know fluorescent lights and bulbs are a big issues right now. people are changing old-style fluorescent bulbs. what's the old one, the new one and the savings? >> the standard of the industry were t-12. this was a four-foot lamp. the 12 stands for and and it's about four or five times more efficient than the typical incandescent light bulb. in the energy to increase energy efficiency. they have a more efficient standard. it's a two footer. it's called the t-8. it's half an inch in diameter. these are bi-pin fluorescent fixtures. these are 10, 15% for efficient than the older t-12. all of the fixtures bought now have the t-8. >> i understand they're going to stop making t-12 bulbs. >> it is scheduled for extinction. >> along the same lines, the city of san francisco is considering an ordinance to require the conversion from the old 212 to t-8 efficiency fixtures or higher. >> there are discussions. many of the large owners have gone to retrofits because there is a very good payback on it. the only commercial
hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead
of energy and life and hope for the world. you have decorated it with peace cranes and light. wishes and dreams, and most importantly your energy. and now, on behalf of the sisters of perpetual indulgence inc, we gather this energy and strength that we may send it to the nuns above and to give it to any and all that needs its strength. to release the energy of hope that this magnificent tree represents i will ask each and every one of you if you please every time you hear me say we say... you will evoke the words of harvey milk by saying as one group you got to give them hope. now please raise your hands towards the tree of hope and we say you got to give them hope. for all lgbtq young people struggling with bullies and intolerance, we say that you got to give them hope for all transgendered people fighting to live with dignity and respect. we say you got to give them hope. for all of those who seek to protect the rights of lgbtq people across the world, we say you got to give them hope. for our sick and elderly in need of a will having word, a sign of hope, we say, you got to give t
might as well put it on those municipal buildings where it reduces the amount of energy use which reduce our loss. so, we're looking at balancing that versus go solar which you give rebates to private citizens. so, these are all the things that we're considering we need to talk with all stakeholders. >> what is the deadline to sunset on solar deductions? >> on the go solar sf program, it's currently concludes in 2018. >> i know you said 2018 for this program. i was referring to the state program in terms of -- >> there isn't a deadline for the california solar incentive. >> i thought -- so it's still in existence? >> it's still in existence. the dollar amount available ratchets down over time, but i don't believe it's projected to go to zero. >> okay. but pretty close? >> yeah. >> all right. commissioner vietor? >> i would be interested, since we are in the thick of the clean power sf conversations, to hear more specifically how this go solar program could be tied to go solar customers -- i mean, to clean power sf customers. and also some thoughts around kind of the marketing and framing
by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their daily life. >> hi. [speaker not understood]. we're a mapping and location-based analytics platform. and we are working with open data and trying to see how we can turn data into information, data into knowledge, and the kind of decision products. >> hi, i'm john, ceo of motion loft. we're trying to understand how people move around cities and provide that data to the public to build new tools for public safety. >> hi, i'm [speaker not understood] with code for america. we're a peace core for geeks. we're trying to bring talent from the private second for and government to innovate. we work with dozens of citieses across the country and next year we should be working with san francisco whi
that a light green program means you're not getting your whole energy or all of your energy from recs or any kind of renewable energy. the light green program in marin is 50% regular energy from wherever they're getting it from and 50% renewable energy credit. so, that is what a light green program is. all the different options we're looking at are all 100%. pg&e needs are going to be 100%. our parav -- program is going to be 100% * whether it's [speaker not understood]. i can look at our solar panel over there and say my money went to that. it doesn't matter to -- the general public doesn't know the difference between bucket 3 recs which are the ones that are unbundled and bucket 1 recs which are ones you can say my money went to that solar panel right therethv they just know they're purchasing 100% renewable energy from the city. the only thing that brings our program apart from pg&e's program is this discussion of local benefits to san francisco. where are the jobs? and right now the plan as we're looking at it doesn't have that language in there. it doesn't have that message so people
's firmly shaped or a bucket 3 which is tradable recs or tradable renewable energy credits, the price of those is dramatically different depending upon which one you choose. and, so, just to give you a rate comparison, if you buy bundled recs, that actually ties the renewable energy to a physical place where we can point to that power plant, that solar panel, that wind farm. that has in the marketplace -- that costs about 5 cents a kilowatt hour. if we buy a tradable rec, we can typically get those for less than a quarter of a penny per kilowatt hour. so, depending upon which green attribute we want to green up our portfolio, be it a light green portfolio versus a dark green portfolio, or whatever shade of green in between, it's either very expensive or less expensive depending upon which ones we do. so, what we've done is we've dusted off the lighter shade of green and then also our premium green product and showed you the mix there. and the key financial considerations are that the renewable product mix is what drives the difference in premium. and our deep green product is about $1
that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval presence in the region, and by having an unambiguous commitment to doing that. i believe that our new national security strategy is that unambiguous commitment, and i believe that the u.s. navy is capable of mai
energy to the public. espinola jackson has always been around. i'm bumping into her constantly. i wish she was here to hear it. her contribution to the city process is profound -- has been profound. and so i not only would want to lionize dr. jackson, but just to say that even though dr. jackson has helped solve many problems like getting rid of the last power plant and stopping a new one from coming in and without her we probably would have never accomplished those goals. but there are still -- and then there's the digester issue. there are still a lot of other issues like the digester issue that are not solved yet. so, i would just strongly urge the commission and the staff to continue to pay attention to dr. jackson and listen to her wise advice, because she knows what she's talking about and she has helped this city process and the sfpuc process i am immeasurably in the last years. >> move to the consent calendar. any member wishing to remove an item, a, b or c? all right. i'll entertain a motion to approve and then we'll get to public comments if there are any. >> i'll move the it
of energy to the healing circle as well. as a juvenile, i was in juvenile hall and i went through that whole system myself. i have worked with tattoo removal, i went to other development programs. through personal experience and being raised by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused
. that gave our small company a lot of experience in the energy business and we use that past performance to get a federal project with the gsa, putting the first biomass boiler in a gsa-owned federal building which was actually a $5 million contract, a very large contract. that type of experience and past performance that we got as an lbelj contractor has gotten us a tremendous amount of work elsewhere and given us a lot of experience. and if you know anyone who does federal work, they require the past performance or they'll kick you out of the job even if you're the low bidder. and that was -- that got us into the energy business or construction business, anyway, and kept us going during some rough economic times. the specific comment to the jock group oversight, i've had within those 70 task orders 70% success. with the 5% that's been difficult, the jock managers have all come almost immediately to any request we've had to resolve disputes we've had with managers in the specific sites, whether it be in hetch hetchy or in [speaker not understood] or at one of those plants locally here,
into the small art gallery of public works. part of the energy of the venue comes from having that art gallery. having a small workshop with a few resident artists who work on art during the day. it provides a certain energy. when that moves on to the employees were working there during the night, coming in contact with patrons, you have a great start and a good experience. great talent, visuals, who have done the other thing for the most part. lots of responses. >> thank you. dmitri, while enhancing your out dope -- outdoor event, how important is the creative contact to make sure it you have customers who return over and over again? >> our creative content, you know, it is pretty out there. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that thenn
. of course, the signature park that is central to the pelly proposal and also a number of energy conservation measures that allowed us to move from the initial target of lead silver to lead gold and the vision that pelly had brought to the competition to the design of the transit center. at that time, we were maintaining the cost estimated cost of construction within the original $1.89 budget through a number of valuing engineering measures both with pelly clark pelly as well as osha working as the cmgc. and we moved into natural ventilation and eliminated a glass enclosure that was to go around the perimeter of the bus boarding island. we reduced the number of skylights at the park level from five to three which opened up more program space in the park for landscape space but, through the use of tubes that the architect had proposed still bringing significant natural lighting to the bus deck level. we had refined the design of the structural system as well as the park landscaping and all of those value engineering efforts had allowed us to maintain a cost estimates within the earned base li
population. in terms of energy was released, you can see there it's one trillion kilograms of tnt, that means an 8.8 earthquake. another comparison could be 18,000 times the hiroshima atomic bomb. it's supposed it occur less than two a year above 8. chili has first runner up with 9.5 with bolivia, 10 minutes duration. this one was 8.8, at that moment was no. 4, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes. usually that things happen at night. i don't know why, but it always happen at night. so we are leading on february 27 at 3.24 and you can see in light blue the time when the first wave arrived the coast because the epicenter was so close to the coast. so it's no more than 10 minutes and at the same time the waves start moving through the pacific ocean and in 21 hours it hits the coast of hawaii. so everybody was affected because of that. in mexico, for instance, the variation of time was 1 1/2 meters. as you can see there, when that happened, 3.34, immediately we have different waves. the high of that wave wa
it will never happen -- when you do not have the energy anymore? that scared of a piece of blank paper and a collection coming up in six weeks -- that does not scare you? >> yes, but i tried to protect myself. for example, i go to a flea market, and nt place. when i see something that i find interesting, even if i have no interest in anything at the moment, i say that one day i will do something from that. i know that there was work on it. i think i have to burn it, because at the end, i take too much time to look at it. but, yes, i mean, to be honest, i think will realize what time that i have no more of the passion, which will mean i will stop. i think it is better. honestly, before i was doing that profession, because i was not at peace with the fact that i was rejected, so i was inventing a lot of things. at the moment, i started to work -- i finish. because i do the things that i'd love to do, why should i live now. there's no reason to lie? because i am accepted through my work? why should i lie? because i do not want to live again in my old days. but i will always interested in
and most of the energy that comes into san francisco is piped in from other places so we have to look at everything from a regional perspective. in terms of what we're doing with our infrastructure, we look at many risks to our systems to improve their reliability, both gas and electric. while we talk about earthquakes quite a bit, we look more at ground movement in general, whether it be earthquake related, land slide related, but in terms of our reliability all those risks are looked at and there's on-going efforts to increase the reliability of both the electric system and the gas system throughout the san francisco area and through the northern and system part of our state. we have hundreds of millions of dollars of pipeline replacement happening which is a major risk in a major earthquake. most people are aware in loma prieta the pipeline held pretty well but we are trying to build in a better manner to withdraw earthquakes. on the electric side, things are pretty well proat the timed already. things shut themselves off. depending on the magnitude of the earthquake, it could
're taking your time, you're taking time out of your lives and putting energy into changing how government can serve the people of our county. and that's very impressive and i for one as a citizen of san francisco am very grateful to each and every one of you for doing that. for watching out for me, because that's what you are, each and every one of you, watching out for me and my well-being as well as everyone else in the city. and around the state, thanks to the california civil grand jury association, we have 58 groups that do the same and help people experience government at a higher level and have government work for them. so, thanks to the california civil grand jury association for doing that, for making that work for us. and on behalf of state senator leno, i have the privilege of presenting the certificate of recognition to the california civil grand jury association. and with our thanks and great appreciation. >> thank you so much. >> thank you. (applause) >> as absolved a group as we may be, we cannot forget that this gathering is primarily to recognize that we're all but citize
there to network. they went out there to give their energy, imagination, their heart to something. >> there is that collaboration, the cross-disciplinary thing that happens out there, but i also feel like there is a bit of a sense of competition. people are trying to outdo each other, try to outdo each other trt impressive thing. >> that is human nature. i read a few years ago somebody complaining, i remember the good old days. you could put up a pink flamingo in front of your tent and it was cool. now with all of these big projects, i feel few tile -- futile. well, they learned the wrong lesson. the interesting thing is, people say that they are connected, but in an environment like that, it is easy to get connected. it is easy to get help. unless you insist on being the leader, you will find something to join. that is what my whole career has been, basically. >> speaking of your career, how did it all start? there are several different versions of the story. some people said it was a sled that was lost that inspired the whole thing. >> it was rosebud. [laughter] it is true -- yo
're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are d
. keep? energy bars. dry food. canned vegetables. can corn, can peas, you can drain that and drink the water and eat the vegetables. buy can food that you eat normally. and a can opener. first aid kit, have 3. have you a small one in the car, have a nice sized one for home and make sure you have one at work. make sure if you are a diabetic or have a heart condition, something that you normal take have a little supply. have a storage area for this. consider this. if you have a supply kit, make sure you have one that's mobile. mobile meaning, if you have to evacuate a square mile for disaster or terrorist or anything, have it in there with you in case you are on your own for a bit. you might not be in your home. you might be somewhere else. there's a tsunami coming in. if you have kids at home what do you keep for them? make sure you keep them entertained and have food they like. the most useful tool in a disaster? scissors. if you use clothes you will be cold. [inaudible]. duct tape. many uses. you want garbage bags. line the toilet with trash bags. you want to line it, line it up
energies and efforts on its behalf. we know this is an issue that is of great importance to the state of california and to the nation. of course we have the opportunity to yet again lead the way here in california. we're offering a bill this year, s.b.-1506 which would redefine the crime of simple possession of a drug from felony to misdemeanor. there are 13 other states, and the federal government which already do this and in the 13 other states, we have the data that shows that we get better results, better outcomes, meaning safer communities, and surprisingly the states include not only the large eastern states of pennsylvania and new york, but also states like mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and then of course there are the unintended consequences of a fel
of time and energy on things like social resolutions. how do you create a culture where people can report problems to each other? which i will talk about in a second, so cue up the next slide. >> dave, can i interrupt for a second? one of the things that i noticed they think is really important for people in the school space and probably law enforcement to remember is that social media platforms whatever it is and you name it -- what? a million apps for the mobile platform alone. those are not the context of bullying. school life, school, peer life, peer relations. that's the concept of bullying whether it's bullying or cyber bullying and this blame the new thing that's come along because we don't fully understand it because we kind of don't like it, or it's a waste of time for kids and all of those things are understandable and we blame what we don't understand, but kids love the media and it's time to start the understanding and understanding that these media are totally blended into their lives. it's not an alternate reality or something separate or add on that the school and the
area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich >> morning and welcome to the transbay joint powers authority for the board of directors for thursday, february 14th. prior to taking role. ortiz may be late. >> metcalf. present. >> ortiz. >> present. >> kim. >> sartipi. >> kim >> here. >> and are there any communications. >> not that i am aware of. >> any new or old business from the brord of directors, seeing none we will move on to the executive director's report. >> good morning, everyone, first i want to have good news, all three butress have been poured and i want to thank everyone who has worked six days, you know, a week, nights and weekends and all sorts of inclement weather. all floors
. it is offgassing and reflecting all the energy. >> in the middle, we are waiting to see if the fire spreads. it is spreading from the one end down. >> the second one has the same material for exposure. it is comparing two buildings with the same protection, against two buildings with the same protection for the main fire building, one for exposure and next to it. the second one is catching. >> we have environmental factors effecting this. we have wind blowing in a certain direction. the exposure on the one next to it not really any heat. this is a good demonstration. >> the interesting deal right off the bat is that one burned down and this one -- >> has yet to ignite. >> i see spoke. >> just the products inside that are burning. >> wow. very exciting. >> so i can imagine -- i'm with the building department, there are real implication for providing fire resistive safety in buildings if we can figure out how to properly apply it and make sure people don't cut holes in it. >> there are fire service and dynamics that go there. the building industry and manufacturers love the late weigh
coming to the table, different perspectives, that energy and enthusiasm around thinking differently, and around paradigm shifts, around developing breakthrough technologies, and to be able to attract those people to this area is crucial. i think that that is something that has been a benefit of being here, that a lot of people are attracted to silicon valley. that is crucial to any company starting in taking their technology to the next level. >> can you talk about the incubator? >> yes. >> the qb3? >> yes, mission bay, everybody knows. uc san francisco has conduct encourage it with research. some of the larger companies that research labs in mission bay as well. bayer and others. they are even innovating about their laboratories, because it is so expensive to build your own laboratory. so they are trying to bring some of these pharmaceutical answers to the market faster. they have an incredible spirit of innovation in those laboratories. and they are inviting other companies, not just from the bay area air even our country, they're inviting international. we had our first canadian
energy solutions, connie frank foundation, jinn ethic intel and mc castle foundation the stanley s foundation union bank, visa wells far go pg&e cummings west and rich and gudegee guggenheim. placegees web corp builders and the lunch is due to our in-kind media sponsors who we would like to also thank c cbs and one 07 a and one 06.9 f and suffrage business times. san francisco chronicle and san francisco gate.com and san francisco mag magazine and beach pointed babylon and thank you to awful you who support the foundation, the general and this event we look forward to seeing many of you this evening at hearts after dark. ladies and gentlemen ...
of the system is fed by gravity, without the use of energy-consuming pumps. valves open to regulate the flow into the 85-mile-long delaware aqueduct -- the longest tunnel in the world. at hillview reservoir... the water is partitioned into another giant tunnel system. where it travels deep below manhattan. the pressure built up by gravity from the mountains pushes the water upwards toward the surface through vertical shafts. these shafts feed the water mains of each neighborhood, which branch into smaller pipes below the streets... feeding into buildings and houses, into the plumbing, and finally, after its long journey, to our faucets. providing water to homes and industry is a monumental task, requiring immense infrastructure. but once the water is delivered and used, it must also be taken away. man: it's important that the waste generated by any society not be left around. cholera, and other diseases and problems, have been spread, because people wound up living in filth. even the ancients understood that you couldn't have the sewage where you lived. and the easiest thing to do was transp
in the state of california right now. looking at six meters. many buildings have one meter, and yet for energy efficiency and for billing purposes, it helps to separate out the meter so you know how much each space is using. there's been a big issue about the so-called submeetering. we're going to see in a little while some new sub meetering equipment. but this is a method which is cost efficient because it allows each person to get their own bill. when you get your own bill, you know you want to keep your billow. where as if the rental unit came power and you don't pay a separate electrical bill, you might not be quite as careful. >> i believe the current public utilities commission code does require all individual residential units to be individually meters. that's for all new work. >> and for commercial, they allow separate submetering. ok. so we brought the power into the building. we're watching our fingers here. we have other ways we'll seat meters >> we have examples, a wide variety of metering and service equipment that can be chosen. the reason i wanted to show you this is to show you
fund. we are looking for businesses that are looking to put in more energy-efficient equipment or retrofit or remove toxins from processed here we have been lending to drive cleaners that are giving you more environmentally friendly products, truck drivers putting in new exhaust systems. finally, just to give you kind of a scale of what we do, mark mentioned the sba right guaranteed 275 loans in a year. we expected to 50 or 60 in san francisco this year, and more like 250 or 300 throughout the bay area.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)

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